Getting the Hang of Art Decoration: Our Foolproof Art Hanging Guide

Decor
DIY
E-Design

Getting the Hang of Art Decoration: Our Foolproof Art Hanging Guide

Part of interior design is ensuring that all the pieces of a space work together. That includes the furniture, fixtures, homewares, accessories, decorations, and last but not least, the artwork. Presenting your art in your newly decorated space can become an artform itself! 

You may have small pieces and larger pieces and are unsure of how and where to hang them. While it may seem daunting at first, we can help you create the masterpiece you’re dreaming of. Follow along as we share a variety of ways to hang your art in your home to complement your space and your own unique style. 

Looking for more at-home support? Why not download our art hanging measurement guide!

Hanging your art on a wall

If you’ve got an empty stretch of wall space and a canvas or framed piece to fit into it, our advice is simple! Hang your art so that the center of the frame is about 60 inches above the floor. 

Hanging your art above furniture

Whenever you’re hanging art above chairs or sofas, you want to make sure that your art is not wider than the seating that you’re hanging it above, and that it’s centered above it. You want the bottom of your artwork to be 6 to 8 inches above the furniture once it’s hung! 

For hanging art above tables, you’ll want to follow the same rule about width of the art we mentioned above. Allow for 10 to 12 inches of space between the bottom of the art and the surface of the table. This may need to be adjusted for other decor items on the table such as lamps. 

Hanging stacked grouping in small spaces

Hanging stacked groupings of art in small spaces such as between two doorways is a popular choice to fill negative space. In this case, space all of your artwork evenly either 1 or 2 inches apart. The centre of your display should be 60 inches up from the floor. 

Hanging stacked groupings in larger spaces

A larger display can feel a bit daunting to put together, but with some patience and time, the reward of the final product is more than worth it! 

Apply the same initial rules as above – space everything evenly 1 or 2 inches apart, and make sure the center of your display is 60 inches above the ground. 

Pro tip: Try laying out your artwork on the floor first and rearranging it until you have the perfect combination that works for you. 

Salon style grouping in larger spaces

A mixture of artwork and objects can really bring a wall to life! 

We recommend using paper, scissors, and brown paper to create templates of the art sizes and shapes you’re planning to hang. Use painters tape to hang your paper templates on the wall to create a mockup of your new display before committing to hanging in any formation. 

Leaning art and mirrors

Leaning art or mirrors can look great in a lot of different locations, such as on mantles or shelves, furniture, on a narrow ledge, or even on the floor. 

We recommend securing all heavy leaning pieces or mirrors to the wall to avoid any accidents, especially if you have children or pets! 

Art on bookshelves

Art can bring a little bit of life to a bookshelf and fill some empty space if you haven’t got enough reading material to pack the shelves yet. 

Try using plate stands or easels on bookshelves to make the art stand out. 

Now you’re ready!

Hanging art is often an overlooked part of pulling your space together. After moving or renovating a space, it’s frequently the final task, and people will grab a stud finder and a screwdriver, and hang the art without measuring. 

With a little extra time and care, properly hung artwork will not only make your space more appealing to the eyes, it will also tie together the entire room. 

With this guide, you’re prepared to hang any and all kinds of art! Want to keep these tips for a later date? Grab the downloadable measurement guide we give to all of our Good Space clients! 

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Author: Molly Sprague

I never imagined working in the interior design industry. My education and life plans were to educate and work with children. In 2012, what started as a temporary job after attending Saint Francis Xavier University, my position at Good Space has become a career that I find deeply fulfilling. I love supporting and nurturing clients through the Good Space Design process. I have an amazing family, treasured friends and a love of spending time in the beautiful outdoors of British Columbia. I play the ukulele, I love my home and spend time with my partner creating nature inspired art.
Filed under: Decor, DIY, E-Design